SkyTruth Image Galleries

By the way, SkyTruth features an ever-growing collection of online image galleries that address issues like hardrock mining, oil and gas drilling, habitat loss, and pollution. The galleries include a variety of maps and pictures taken from public and commercial orbiting satellites, government aerial surveys, and out-the-window shots taken from low-flying aircraft (most of those aerial pics are provided by our friends at EcoFlight). And important ground-truth photos taken by ordinary folks all over the world that complement the high-flying SkyTruth perspective.

We’ve also created simulations to show what proposed developments – such as gold mines and natural-gas fields – could look like if they are built:
Browse the complete list of galleries here. Once you’re in a gallery, click on any pic to get a bigger version accompanied by a descriptive caption; click on “Medium” or “Large” to display even larger versions, and “Original” to download the highest-resolution version available.

Please contact us (info@skytruth.org) if you’d like to use any of the pictures from our site. We typically grant permission for non-profit, educational and media use.

Preble’s Meadow Jumping Mouse

Here’s an animal you’ve probably never heard of. The Preble’s Meadow Jumping Mouse is native to the eastern slope of the Rockies in Wyoming and Colorado. Unfortunately for the mouse, it lives exactly where many of us want to: nestled in the hills at the foot of those beautiful mountains. Urban sprawl is tough on this critter. Conservationists are trying to give the mouse a hand: in 1998 it was listed as threatened under the Endangered Species Act, with “critical habitat” designated for protection in 2003. The attempts to protect the mouse and its habitat have been controversial, and in November 2007 the Fish and Wildlife Service “delisted” the mouse from protection in Wyoming, while reaffirming the protection in Colorado.

In partnership with Center for Native Ecosystems, SkyTruth decided to take a look at what’s been happening in the “critical habitat” areas in Colorado. We overlaid those areas on the high-resolution satellite imagery in Google Earth, and found 25 places where development of some kind already existed or has since occurred within the critical habitat. The Google images are probably no more than a few years old; this example shows a new subdivision obviously under construction that is encroaching on a critical-habitat zone. It certainly looks like the mouse is losing the battle.

Google Earth users can explore this for themselves using the KMZ file we created. And all are welcome to browse our online image gallery: click on any image in the gallery to see a bigger version with a descriptive caption; then click on “Large” to see an even bigger pic.

Welcome to SkyTruth!

Welcome to the new SkyTruth blog. We’ll use this space to keep you up to date on what we’re doing. And once in a while, to ask for your help when we run into problems we can’t solve, or great project ideas that we’re too maxed out to tackle.

What is SkyTruth? We’re a non-profit, 501(c)(3) organization based in groovy Shepherdstown, West Virginia, about 70 miles upstream from Washington, DC. But we see SkyTruth as more than that – it’s also a noun (think “ground truth”), and we hope, a global movement to produce visual proof of our impact on the landscapes, habitats and environment of the planet to anyone who cares to see it. Our tools of choice for this mission are images and photos taken from above: from orbiting satellites and from airplanes. Our tools are “remote sensing” and geographic information systems (GIS), used to help people understand our changing world and motivate them to take action to protect and preserve the environment.

But a picture is worth a thousand words. To get a better feel for what we’ve done since we started up in 2001, start at our home page and take some time to check out our online image galleries.

We hope you’ll check out this space regularly!