Teri Biebel Found Her Fit at SkyTruth

Doing Good Through SkyTruth

Teri Biebel was drained and exhausted. Not just from a long shift at the casino where she worked, but from 24 years in the casino industry. She was ready for a change. So one afternoon Teri called her friend Holly at Shepherd University to see if there were any job openings at the school. There weren’t. But Shepherdstown, West Virginia is a tight-knit community, and Holly had spoken with SkyTruth Board Member Paul Woods at a recent Rotary Club meeting. Paul had mentioned that SkyTruth was looking for an office administrator.

“We both didn’t know what SkyTruth did,” Teri says now. “Holly said something like ‘they use radar to do stuff. Let me contact Paul.’” Paul told SkyTruth President John Amos that someone was interested in the job. When John called Teri to see if she wanted to meet. Teri said, “absolutely. I hate what I’m doing.”

Teri grew up in Wildwood, New Jersey, on the beach and not far from Atlantic City. She and her husband Don both worked at the casinos, and Don also served in the Navy Reserve (after a six-year career in active duty). Soon after he returned from his deployment to Kuwait in 2005-2006, Teri and Don took a much-needed vacation together in Hawaii. It was there that they got the call: The casino was downsizing. Don had lost his job.

Both of them soon found work at the casino in Charles Town, West Virginia and settled in nearby Shepherdstown. With two young daughters, they worked alternate shifts. But Teri became tired of taking people’s money. She remembers one customer who won a million dollars, but then gambled it all away and ended up losing everything: his home, his job, and his million dollars.

When John met Teri he was impressed with her professional experience, but also her recent personal accomplishments: Teri had just run her first marathon and lost 60 pounds in the process. “She had a lot of responsibility in her previous jobs at the casinos,” says John. “And we needed someone who could handle that level of responsibility. I was still the only SkyTruth employee at that point, so I needed someone I could depend on.“ The fact that she had trained for and run a marathon “said a lot about her,” according to John, and what she could accomplish.

Teri started in December 2010 and has watched SkyTruth grow from two employees to 10 or more now. She recalls that on her first or second day she attended a SkyTruth board meeting to take notes. That was when she first saw John in action. “When John talks he commands attention,” she says now. “You want to hear more. I never knew this stuff existed, that you could use satellite imagery to track oil spills or anything.” She likes her job at SkyTruth because she learns so much. In addition to her office administration duties, Teri has tracked oil pollution in the ocean using imagery, including the years-long spill at the Taylor Energy site in the Gulf of Mexico. (Thanks to SkyTruth’s dogged tracking of this spill, the Coast Guard finally ordered the company to fix the leak last year.) “This is my ninth year at SkyTruth and I’m still fascinated with all the things that we can see and do and change,” she says.

Perhaps even more importantly, “I feel like we’re helping people. We’re providing this data to help people see what’s going on around them… It’s a huge contrast” from her old job she says. “I feel like I’m doing good now.”

The Biebel family selfie

The move to Shepherdstown has also been good for Teri’s daughters Jenn and Amanda. Both are now students at West Virginia University and are skilled musicians. The band program in the local high school “is second to none,” according to Teri and both her girls benefited greatly from the experience. In fact, Jenn, who plays trumpet, was nominated by her band director in high school, and accepted, into the US Army All American Marching Band. The Army flew her and 124 other American high school students to San Antonio, Texas for a week. They toured the Alamo and the San Antonio River Walk, and then marched at the Army All-American High School Bowl Game (comprised of high school seniors from around the country). “I’m not sure they would have had that [band] experience if we stayed in New Jersey,” says Teri. She wrote about one of her own profound experiences during the San Antonio trip for her blog Snarkfest (a blog she describes as “thoughts from a totally snarkastic Mom”).

And despite a few lapses to raise her girls, Teri has kept running. So far, she has run three full marathons, 21 half marathons and two Tough Mudders. Tough Mudders are 10-mile races with two or three obstacles each mile. Later this month she’ll be running the Marine Corps Marathon in Washington D.C. for the second time. With her daughters away at college, Teri has found time for long training runs again. She also has discovered that, as she puts it, “being an empty nester isn’t as bad as I thought. I miss all that [childhood] stuff….But my girls are where they need to be. It’s time for me now.”

Note: This post was updated 10/8/19 to correct Don’s time in the Navy.

New Writer–Editor Amy Mathews Joins SkyTruth Team

Telling SkyTruth’s stories

SkyTruth is both an intensely local and vibrantly global organization. Based in Shepherdstown, West Virginia, many of our highly talented staff are long-time residents (and some were even born and raised here). That makes our work on Appalachian issues such as mountaintop mining and fracking personal − it’s happening in our backyard, typically with little oversight from government agencies. But confronting global environmental challenges sometimes means reaching beyond local borders and finding the right people to take on a task that no one else has tackled before. And so SkyTruth’s family of staff and consultants includes programmers and others from around the world, plus top notch research partners at universities and other institutions.

The SkyTruth team in Shepherdstown, West Virginia. Photo by Hali Taylor.

As SkyTruth’s new Writer–Editor, I plan to bring you their stories in coming months, to add to the remarkable findings and tools the staff regularly share through this blog. We’ll learn more about the people whose passion propels our cutting-edge work. And we’ll learn more about all of you – the SkyTruthers who use these tools and information to make a difference in the world. We’ll share your impact stories: That is, how you’ve made a difference in your neighborhood, state, nation or the world at large.

To start, I’ll share a little bit about myself. As a kid, stories hooked me on conservation. I used to watch every National Geographic special I could find and never missed an episode of Wild Kingdom (remember that?). My fascination with all things wild led me to major in wildlife biology at Cornell University. But I quickly realized that I wasn’t a scientist at heart − I was more interested in saving creatures than studying them. I spent spring semester of my junior year in Washington, D.C. and shifted my focus to environmental policy. That decision led to dual graduate degrees in environmental science and public affairs at Indiana University and a long career in environmental policy analysis, program evaluation, and advocacy in Washington.

Urban life and policy gridlock eventually pushed me to Shepherdstown, where nature was closer at hand. I became involved in Shepherdstown’s American Conservation Film Festival, which reignited my passion for storytelling and the inspiration it can trigger. And so, after years of working and consulting for the federal government, conservation groups and charitable foundations, I returned to my conservation roots. I completed my M.A. in nonfiction writing at Johns Hopkins University in May 2013 and left my policy work behind.

Radio-collared Mexican wolf. Photo courtesy of U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service.

Since then, my writing has appeared in publications such as The Washington Post, Pacific Standard, Scientific American, High Country News, Wonderful West Virginia and other outlets. In fact, my 2018 story on the endangered Mexican wolf for Earth Touch News recently won a Genesis Award from the Humane Society of the United States for Outstanding Online News. I was thrilled to be able to observe a family of wolves as part of my reporting for that story, and I always welcome new opportunities to go out in the field and learn about the important work conservationists are doing.

During my time as a freelance journalist, I also led workshops for the nonprofit science communication organization COMPASS, teaching environmental (and other) scientists how to communicate their work more effectively to journalists, policymakers, and others.

There’s one more thing I’d like to share: Although my official role at SkyTruth as Writer–Editor is new, I’ve known SkyTruth since its very beginning. I still remember the day SkyTruth founder John Amos and I sat down at our dining room table and he told me his vision for a new nonprofit. His goal was to level the playing field by giving those trying to protect the planet the same satellite tools used by industries exploiting the planet. John is my husband, and SkyTruth’s journey has been exciting, frightening, gratifying, and sometimes frustrating, with many highs and the occasional low. But it has never been boring.

I’m looking forward to sharing SkyTruth stories with all of you, making sure they move beyond the dining room table to your homes and offices, inspiring you, your colleagues, your friends and families to make the most of what SkyTruth has to offer. Feel free to reach out to me at info@skytruth.org if you’d like to share how you’ve used SkyTruth tools and materials. Just include my name in the subject line and the words “impact story.” Let’s talk!

Note: Portions of this text first appeared on the website amymathewsamos.com.