Bilge Dumping off the Coast of Brazil

The cause of the massive oil spill plaguing Brazil’s beaches is still unknown, but monitoring reveals a potential new bilge dumping incident

We still haven’t found the cause of the massive oil spill that’s been plaguing Brazil’s beaches since early September.  

But SkyTruth’s continued surveillance of the coast of northeastern Brazil, in response to one of the country’s worst oil-related environmental disasters ever, has uncovered what appears to be another previously unreported bilge dumping incident off the coast of Joao Pessoa in the state of Paraiba. Located about 20 km offshore, a 25 km-long slick appears to originate from the Grajau, a Brazil-flagged liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) tanker. Slicks such as this are a hallmark of the intentional dumping of untreated, oily bilge wastes from vessels underway at sea, although there may be other explanations for this slick (for example, the ship was experiencing a serious mechanical problem). The slick (a long, dark streak) and vessel (a bright spot at the south end of the slick) are shown on this Sentinel-1 radar satellite image taken on the 19th of July. We identified the vessel using their public AIS tracking broadcasts, extracted from the ShipView vessel-tracking platform. The image was captured at 07:53 UTC; a careful look at the AIS broadcasts from Grajau just before and after the image was taken show that the vessel we can see on the radar image is very likely Grajau.

Recent discoveries of bilge dumping in the Atlantic Ocean along Brazil’s coast reveal that this is a persistent problem that — as in many places — lacks effective enforcement. None of the slicks we’ve seen appear big enough to be the source of the oil plaguing Brazil’s beaches. This potential bilge slick from Grajau is no exception: it’s a modest-sized slick compared with the dozens of bilge slicks we’ve seen from other places around the world that are occasionally more than 100 km long. And this slick, just 20 km offshore, probably would have dissipated or washed ashore several weeks before the thick globs of heavy oil began to appear on the beaches in early September.

Nevertheless, bilge dumping is a chronic source of oil pollution in the ocean that has been hidden for too long. Now that we can see it, and can identify the likely polluters, it’s time for governments to take action to bring this illegal practice to an end.

AIS ship-tracking broadcasts (red dots) from the Brazil-flagged LPG tanker Grajau, overlain on a Sentinel-1 radar satellite image showing an apparent bilge-dumping slick (dark streak) and the vessel that appears to be responsible (bright spot, indicated within the red circle). Based on the AIS data, we think this vessel is likely the Grajau. See inset map at upper right for detail. Image was collected at 07:53 on July 19.

The location of the boat, relative to Brazil’s coastline.

Teri Biebel Found Her Fit at SkyTruth

Doing Good Through SkyTruth

Teri Biebel was drained and exhausted. Not just from a long shift at the casino where she worked, but from 24 years in the casino industry. She was ready for a change. So one afternoon Teri called her friend Holly at Shepherd University to see if there were any job openings at the school. There weren’t. But Shepherdstown, West Virginia is a tight-knit community, and Holly had spoken with SkyTruth Board Member Paul Woods at a recent Rotary Club meeting. Paul had mentioned that SkyTruth was looking for an office administrator.

“We both didn’t know what SkyTruth did,” Teri says now. “Holly said something like ‘they use radar to do stuff. Let me contact Paul.’” Paul told SkyTruth President John Amos that someone was interested in the job. When John called Teri to see if she wanted to meet. Teri said, “absolutely. I hate what I’m doing.”

Teri grew up in Wildwood, New Jersey, on the beach and not far from Atlantic City. She and her husband Don both worked at the casinos, and Don also served in the Navy Reserve (after a six-year career in active duty). Soon after he returned from his deployment to Kuwait in 2005-2006, Teri and Don took a much-needed vacation together in Hawaii. It was there that they got the call: The casino was downsizing. Don had lost his job.

Both of them soon found work at the casino in Charles Town, West Virginia and settled in nearby Shepherdstown. With two young daughters, they worked alternate shifts. But Teri became tired of taking people’s money. She remembers one customer who won a million dollars, but then gambled it all away and ended up losing everything: his home, his job, and his million dollars.

When John met Teri he was impressed with her professional experience, but also her recent personal accomplishments: Teri had just run her first marathon and lost 60 pounds in the process. “She had a lot of responsibility in her previous jobs at the casinos,” says John. “And we needed someone who could handle that level of responsibility. I was still the only SkyTruth employee at that point, so I needed someone I could depend on.“ The fact that she had trained for and run a marathon “said a lot about her,” according to John, and what she could accomplish.

Teri started in December 2010 and has watched SkyTruth grow from two employees to 10 or more now. She recalls that on her first or second day she attended a SkyTruth board meeting to take notes. That was when she first saw John in action. “When John talks he commands attention,” she says now. “You want to hear more. I never knew this stuff existed, that you could use satellite imagery to track oil spills or anything.” She likes her job at SkyTruth because she learns so much. In addition to her office administration duties, Teri has tracked oil pollution in the ocean using imagery, including the years-long spill at the Taylor Energy site in the Gulf of Mexico. (Thanks to SkyTruth’s dogged tracking of this spill, the Coast Guard finally ordered the company to fix the leak last year.) “This is my ninth year at SkyTruth and I’m still fascinated with all the things that we can see and do and change,” she says.

Perhaps even more importantly, “I feel like we’re helping people. We’re providing this data to help people see what’s going on around them… It’s a huge contrast” from her old job she says. “I feel like I’m doing good now.”

The Biebel family selfie

The move to Shepherdstown has also been good for Teri’s daughters Jenn and Amanda. Both are now students at West Virginia University and are skilled musicians. The band program in the local high school “is second to none,” according to Teri and both her girls benefited greatly from the experience. In fact, Jenn, who plays trumpet, was nominated by her band director in high school, and accepted, into the US Army All American Marching Band. The Army flew her and 124 other American high school students to San Antonio, Texas for a week. They toured the Alamo and the San Antonio River Walk, and then marched at the Army All-American High School Bowl Game (comprised of high school seniors from around the country). “I’m not sure they would have had that [band] experience if we stayed in New Jersey,” says Teri. She wrote about one of her own profound experiences during the San Antonio trip for her blog Snarkfest (a blog she describes as “thoughts from a totally snarkastic Mom”).

And despite a few lapses to raise her girls, Teri has kept running. So far, she has run three full marathons, 22 half marathons and two Tough Mudders. Tough Mudders are 10-mile races with two or three obstacles each mile. Later this month she’ll be running the Marine Corps Marathon in Washington D.C. for the second time. With her daughters away at college, Teri has found time for long training runs again. She also has discovered that, as she puts it, “being an empty nester isn’t as bad as I thought. I miss all that [childhood] stuff….But my girls are where they need to be. It’s time for me now.”

Note: This post was updated 10/8/19 to correct Don’s time in the Navy.

More oil pollution in southeast Asia: suspected bilge dumping off Indonesia and The Philippines

[This analysis of oil pollution in the waters of southeast Asia was written as part of a collaborative effort between SkyTruth team members Lucy Meyer and Brendan Jarrell.]

Our routine monitoring of the world’s oceans has led to some extraordinary findings. For example, in previous updates, we’ve identified oil slicks in traffic-heavy locations like the Strait of Malacca. But as you’ll see in this post, bilge dumps occur elsewhere in southeast Asia. 

Those who follow our posts are probably familiar with how we identify vessels at sea. To new readers, let us explain what bilge dumping is and how we identify potentially responsible vessels. Bilge dumping is the disposal of waste water from a ship’s lower hull. Bilge water is supposed to be treated before it’s discharged, but sometimes vessel operators will bypass the pollution control equipment and flush oily, untreated bilge into the ocean – in direct violation of marine pollution law. We use images from satellites to monitor for illegal bilge dumping. In satellite imagery, oily bilge dumps usually form distinctive linear slicks. By matching the time of the imagery to broadcasts from a vessel tracking service called automatic identification system (AIS), we can determine the identity of vessels that appear to be causing the slicks. We used this process to identify the vessel associated with a long bilge slick in Figure 1 below.

 

Figure 1: A vessel shown passing through the Sunda Strait, identified as the Sungai Gerong, apparently trailing a long oily bilge slick.

 

This Sentinel-1 radar satellite image from July 2nd shows a slick about 177 kilometers long around the southwest tip of Banten Province, Island of Java, Indonesia (Figure 1). In the yellow box, you can see a vessel at the head of the slick. By investigating AIS broadcasts from exactEarth’s ShipView service, we identified an Indonesian oil products tanker named the Sungai Gerong as the likely vessel. The satellite scene, captured at 22:33 UTC (Coordinated Universal Time), shows a slick that closely aligns to the AIS broadcasts from the Sungai Gerong.

You’ll probably notice that the tail-end of the slick is a bit contorted and offset from the track of the Sungai Gerong. The slick’s appearance was likely influenced by ocean currents and local weather conditions between the time of the ship’s passing and when the image was taken. Global wind maps show that there were 10-15 knot winds blowing northwest up to six hours before the image was acquired. This data suggests that wind likely impacted the slick’s appearance. As a result, we believe that the Sungai Gerong is the likely source of this slick.

Using AIS, we tracked the Sungai Gerong as it traveled north through the Sunda Strait — the body of water between the Indonesian islands of Java and Sumatra — to the port of Jakarta. Similar to the Strait of Malacca, the Sunda is an important waterway that connects the Indian Ocean to the Java Sea. Though not as dense with marine traffic as the Malacca Strait, the Sunda is still subjected to pollution from vessels. 

We also recently identified two suspected bilge dumps in the Philippines (Figure 2). Occurring on July 6th in the South China Sea, a 238 kilometer long slick behind the vessel in this Sentinel-1 radar image looks like a bilge dump. The Philippine island of Palawan, a popular tourist destination for its beautiful natural landscape, appears on the right side of the map frame. Another smaller slick without a known source is visible to the left of the larger slick.

 

Figure 2: The Ulaya makes its way through the South China Sea. Palawan Island, a part of the Philippines, can be seen to the right.

 

Using AIS broadcasts from ShipView, we identified the Ulaya, a Thai oil tanker, as a possible source of the slick. The last AIS broadcast from the Ulaya (seen directly above the ship) was transmitted fifteen minutes before the image was captured. These AIS broadcasts give us reason to believe that the Ulaya could be responsible for this slick. Moreover, ShipView shows that the vessel was headed towards the Port of Belawan in the Strait of Malacca with a shipment of  Dangerous Goods. According to the International Maritime Organization, a United Nations agency that regulates global shipping, chemicals falling under this classification are “hazardous to marine environments.” Thus, a slick from this ship could be of greater concern than usual.

These examples show that bilge dumping continues to be a problem in the waters of southeast Asia. But with satellite imagery, anyone, anywhere can see what’s happening on the water and help to raise the alarm. We hope that our persistent and careful surveillance will inspire others to pressure policy makers, government regulators, and the shipping industry to take strong, coordinated action to stop bilge dumping.

“Well Kick” Causes Spill in Java Sea

Following up on recent reports of oil in the water off the north coast of Karawang Regency, West Java, Indonesia, SkyTruth has picked up a slick in Sentinel-1 radar imagery. In the image from July 18th, an unidentified platform (circled in red) located roughly 12 km north of the Karawang shore is shown emitting a 34.7 km-long slick into the Java Sea. A story written by the local Jakarta Post on July 18th describes state-owned energy firm Pertamina’s decision to evacuate personnel and halt operations at an offshore production rig in their Offshore Northwest Java (ONWJ) block. The evacuation was ordered after a dangerous “well kick”, or unplanned release of gas caused by low pressure in a wellbore, initiated a large slick on the 16th of July. A separate report released by the Jakarta Post five days later indicated that the Indonesian Transportation Ministry teamed up with Pertamina in response to the oil-related event, along with several other smaller entities in the area. The response vessels were able to set up a boom around the perimeter of the offshore platform. Unfortunately, this didn’t stop oil from reaching villages and beaches on West Java’s coast. Given the fact that several vessels surround the unidentified object in the Sentinel-1 image, we believe that this could be the affected drilling platform. Pertamina’s upstream director Dharmawan Samsu estimated that it will take approximately eight weeks for the oil and gas leakage to be plugged.

The unidentified platform (circled in red) can be seen leaking oil into the Java Sea. Several small vessels are in the platform’s proximity.

Bilge slick detail

PERKASA Caught Bilge-Dumping?

Possible Bilge Dumping by Indonesian Cement Carrier in the Strait of Malacca

By Lucy Meyer

On February 15, 2019, a vessel that appeared to be releasing oily waste was captured by satellite almost 10 kilometers offshore Peureulak, a small town in Aceh Province, on the northern tip of the Indonesian island of Sumatra. Radar imagery from the European Space Agency’s Sentinel-1 satellite shows an 18-kilometer slick trailing a northbound ship, visible as a bright spot at the end of the dark slick.

Bilge slick detail
Figure 1. Sentinel-1 radar satellite image showing suspected bilge-dumping (dark, linear slick) off Sumatra on February 15, 2019.

The ship is traveling through the Strait of Malacca, a narrow strip of water between Sumatra and the Malay Peninsula. The Strait is one of the world’s busiest shipping lanes as it is both the shortest and most convenient path between the Indian and Pacific Oceans. Due to the Strait’s high density of marine traffic of all types, oil spills — accidental and intentional — are likely to occur. Figure 1 illustrates suspected bilge dumping, a typically intentional discharge of oily waste from ships to reduce ballast water or free up space in the cargo holds. Typically, bilge-dumps form distinctive linear slicks visible on satellite imagery.

While radar satellite images are very useful tools for detecting slicks, they are typically not detailed enough to allow identification of the responsible vessel. However, many vessels broadcast their identity and other information using the radio-frequency Automatic Identification System (AIS). AIS use is required for all large cargo vessels and tankers. By studying the AIS broadcasts in this area using exactEarth’s ShipView service, which collects the signals using satellites and ground-based receivers, SkyTruth analyst Bjorn Bergman determined the Indonesian cement carrier PERKASA (Figure 2) was at this location when the Sentinel-1 radar image was acquired. Formerly known as KOEI MARU NO 7, the vessel was built in 1981 by Ube Industries, Ltd., a Japanese chemical manufacturing company. Today, the ship is operated by PT Indobaruna Bulk Transport (IBT), an Indonesian shipping company based in Jakarta.

PERKASA
Figure 2. MV PERKASA [source: IBT].
PERKASA AIS track
Figure 3. PERKASA’s AIS broadcast track overlain on Sentinel-1 image.

Figure 3 shows the PERKASA’s  AIS-derived track overlain on the Sentinel-1 image, revealing a very close match between the vessel’s path and the suspected bilge slick. The AIS signal immediately to the south of the vessel location on the image indicates it was traveling 11 knots (~20.4 km/h) at 11:17 UTC;  the signal immediately following at 12:10 UTC indicate the vessel was traveling 10.8 knots (~20.0 km/h). Using the location data encoded with these AIS signals, we calculated the likely position of PERKASA at the instant the image was acquired (11:43 UTC). The ship’s predicted location closely matches the vessel’s position in the Sentinel-1 image, and no other vessels broadcasting AIS were likely candidates for a match. This leads us to infer that PERKASA is the vessel seen apparently discharging oily bilge waste in the satellite image.

Slicks to the south
Figure 4. Zoomed-out view of Sentinel-1 image showing a series of patchy slicks along the coast of Aceh Province, Indonesia. Dark, linear slick at upper left is the suspected bilge slick from PERKASA shown in Figures 1 and 3.

To the south, a chain of less-distinctive slicks along the coast are roughly aligned with PERKASA’s track (Figure 4). These slicks are broad and striated as opposed to the slender 18-kilometer long slick, which could be a result of wind and current blowing apart what had originally been a series of discharges from the vessel. The AIS transmissions from PERKASA are infrequent in this region (Figure 5), making us somewhat less confident that this vessel was also the source of these patchy slicks.

Slicks to the south + AIS
Figure 5. PERKASA’s AIS-derived track overlain on Figure 4.

The operator of PERKASA, IBT, claims “we put high priority in safety by adhering to policies, practices, and procedures in our Safety Management System to ensure the safety of crews, staffs, cargoes, vessels, as well as environment.” In addition nearly all of IBT’s fleet is registered with classification societies. According to The International Association of Classification Societies (IACS), the purpose of a classification society is “to provide classification and statutory services and assistance to the maritime industry and regulatory bodies as regards maritime safety and pollution prevention.” IACS is a non-governmental organization composed of twelve classification societies.  PERKASA is registered with Biro Klasifikasi Indonesia (BKI) and Nippon Kaiji Kyokai (ClassNK), which is a member of IACS.  

One of the certification services provided by ClassNK is the Verification for Clean Shipping Index (CSI). The objective of CSI is to verify the environmental performance of a vessel’s operations in five areas, including water and wastes. Ballast water, sewage/black water, garbage, sludge oils, and bilge water are covered under this category.

Bilge dumping — intentional or otherwise — would seem to violate the principles touted by the vessel operator, and call into question the effectiveness of the classification societies.