BP / Gulf Oil Spill – Radar Image, May 13, 2010

NASA/MODIS images have been too cloudy to be much use for May 12 and 13 (see the most recent image we processed, for May 11). But a radar image taken by the Italian COSMO-SkyMed system clearly shows most of the slick in stark detail:

COSMO-SkyMed radar image (black-and-white) superimposed on cloudy NASA/MODIS image. Both images taken May 13, 2010. Radar image courtesy CSTARS.

The slick covers 4,922 square miles (12,748 km2) on the radar image, and is within about 25 miles of the Delta shoreline. The slick clearly extends south beyond the edge of the radar image; hints of it are visible on the MODIS image through the clouds and haze.

See all the images in our Flickr gallery.

BP / Gulf Oil Spill – MODIS Satellite Image – May 10, 2010

Yesterday’s MODIS/Terra satellite image has some of the usual complications – clouds, haze, and turbidity again may be obscuring portions of the slick. Observable slick and sheen covers 4,683 square miles (12,129 km2). Thicker, fresh-looking oil is apparent in the vicinity of the leaking well, and still appears to be entrained in a counterclockwise gyre (a circular current):

See all of the images in our Deepwater Horizon oil spill gallery. Follow us on Twitter, and you’ll know what we know as soon as we know it…

Spilltracker – Show Us What’s Happening On Your Beach

In partnership with Surfrider and Ocean Conservancy, SkyTruth has launched an interactive website, the Gulf Oil Spill Tracker, that lets Gulf-area residents document what’s happening to their coast. Anyone can search the site, using an interactive map, to find reports that others have submitted. Reports can include text descriptions, photos, and links to video and news articles. Anyone can submit their own report by clicking on the map to indicate the location, and uploading their own photos and info:

We intend to use this to document pre-spill and post-spill conditions, and to give cleanup volunteers a way to show the world the great work they’re doing. The more people who participate, the better, so please send this link to your Gulf-area friends, members, and other organizations!

BP / Gulf Oil Spill – MODIS Satellite Image – May 9, 2010

MODIS / Aqua satellite image, May 9, 2010.

Today’s MODIS satellite image from NASA shows plenty of oil slick in the Gulf of Mexico from the ongoing BP / Deepwater Horizon spill – slicks and sheen cover about 4,384 square miles (11,355 km 2) although clouds, haze and turbidity (again…) are possibly obscuring portions of the slick. Fresh-looking oil is still moving southeast away from the site of the leaking well, and appears to be caught in a counterclockwise gyre (a circular current at the ocean’s surface – not uncommon in the northern Gulf). This may be helping to keep most of the oil trapped close the the leaking well, although the slick also extends northwest to the fringes of the Mississippi Delta, and large patch of slicks is visible far to the west, in the vicinity of Port Fourchon.

We estimate this well is leaking at a rate of 1.1 million gallons (26,500 barrels) per day. At this rate, the spill has now exceeded 21 million gallons. Most news accounts of this spill are repeating a much lower estimate of 210,000 gallons (5,000 barrels) per day, an unexplained number that NOAA and the Coast Guard were using for a few days until they admitted a week ago that they couldn’t accurately estimate the flow rate. We think it’s better not to use any number at all than to lock in on an unrealistically low estimate that nobody currently supports. Read why we think that here.

BP / Gulf Oil Spill – How Big Is It?

Quite a lot bigger than the estimate being uncritically quoted throughout the media of 210,000 gallons (5,000 barrels) per day. That was the last “official” estimate made by NOAA and accepted by the Coast Guard back on April 29 (see timeline below). Before that, the Coast Guard estimates ranged from 336,000 gallons (8,000 barrels) per day, to zero, to 42,000 gallons (1,000 barrels) per day. None of these estimates has been publicly explained or substantiated. And on May 1, the Coast Guard and NOAA stopped trying to estimate the spill rate, with Admiral Thad Allen saying, “Any exact estimate is probably impossible at this time.”

But the media continues to report that oil is leaking into the Gulf at 5,000 barrels per day. At SkyTruth we estimate the spill rate is closer to 1.1 million gallons (26,500 barrels) per day, based on the size of the slick on satellite images and Coast Guard maps, and thickness estimates derived from visual descriptions of the slick. That puts us at a total spill of 21 million gallons so far.

Considering that there are deepwater oil wells in the Gulf of Mexico capable of producing >1.26 million gallons (30,000 barrels) of oil per day under controlled flow rates; and that the oil slick continues to grow in size even though it’s been under attack 24/7 by skimmer vessels, burning, chemical dispersants, and natural processes; our estimate seems quite conservative.

Why is it important to get this number right? This is about more than just liability, or PR. You can bet that our future response capacity is going to be overhauled and retooled based on this spill. If we low-ball the spill amount and rate, we run the risk of designing an inadequate new spill-response system that is doomed to fail the next time something this big occurs.

Here’s the timeline of spill estimates:

  • 4/22 – Deepwater Horizon rig sinks; Coast Guard estimates “up to” 8,000 barrels per day (bpd) is leaking – source
  • 4/23 – Coast Guard reports no leaking at all from the damaged well – source
  • 4/24 – Coast Guard reports well is leaking, estimates 1,000 bpd – source
  • 4/25 – BP repeats 1,000 bpd estimate – source
  • 4/27 – 1,000 bpd still the official Coast Guard and BP estimate – source
  • 4/27 – SkyTruth and Dr. Ian MacDonald publish first estimate that spill rate is 20,000 bpd – source
  • 4/28 – NOAA weighs in and raises the official estimate to 5,000 bpd based on aerial surveys “and other factors”; BP disputes this higher estimate – source
  • 4/29 – Coast Guard and NOAA repeat their estimate of 5,000 bpd – source
  • 4/29 – BP’s Chief Operating Officer admits new estimate of 5,000 bpd may be correct; “He said there was no way to measure the flow at the seabed and estimates have to come from how much oil makes it to the surface” – source
  • 5/1 – SkyTruth and Dr. Ian MacDonald publish revised estimate of at least 26,500 bpd – source
  • 5/1 – Coast Guard Admiral Thad Allen “acknowledged there was no way really to know the extent of the leak” – source – and stated that “Any exact estimate is probably impossible at this time” – source
  • 5/1 – Coast Guard and NOAA cease estimating the rate of the spill. BP continues to use 5,000 barrels per day as their estimate of the spill rate.