New Intern Matthew Ibarra Shifts from Aerospace Engineering to Protecting the Planet from Space

Matthew thought he wanted to be an aerospace engineer when he started college. Then he learned more about environmental damage to the planet.

Hello There!

My name is Matthew Ibarra and I am a new intern at SkyTruth. I am currently a student attending West Virginia University (WVU). Originally I came to WVU to study mechanical and aerospace engineering. I have always been passionate about math and science and so naturally I believed engineering would be a perfect fit for me. I was a part of my robotics team in high school and I believed this would be something I could do forever. 

However, as my time at WVU went on I became much less interested in engineering and I decided that I wanted to study something else. Through my engineering classes I inadvertently learned more about energy and from there about renewable energy sources. I developed a passion for renewables and I decided I wanted to shift my focus of study and work on environmental challenges. I have always felt there is a lot more bad news than good news in the world and I kept hearing about problems such as massive deforestation in the Amazon, pollution of the planet and the oceans — and those were just the tip of the melting iceberg. I wanted to do something that would leave a lasting impact. All of these factors pushed me to change my major to Environmental and Energy Resource Management. And it was the best decision I have ever made. 

Matthew played saxaphone for the WVU marching band and currently plays clarinet in the WVU Concert Band and saxophone in the WVU pep band. Photo by Roger Sealey.

My best friend Amanda’s mother Teri works at SkyTruth as our office administrator, which was very serendipitous for me. Amanda told me about SkyTruth and I was excited to learn how SkyTruth gathers environmental data and conducts research using satellite imagery. I was intrigued because it seemed like SkyTruth worked in all the areas I was passionate about: the environment, technology, and research. I looked into some of SkyTruth’s current and past projects and the ones that excited me the most include FrackFinder, which helps keep track of the environmental impacts of fracking for natural gas. I was also excited about SkyTruth’s interactive maps that help track the removal of mountaintops from coal mining. SkyTruth works on many other projects that I knew that I wanted to be a part of as well. An internship at SkyTruth was the perfect way for me to not only help work on projects I cared about, but also to learn more about what I am interested in.

As an intern I am currently working to monitor the South East Asia region for bilge dumps. Bilge dumps are illegal practices by vessels that attempt to bypass pollution control and dump their oily ballast and waste water at sea. I am collecting useful data that will contribute to a machine learning program that can automatically detect bilge dumps from satellite images around the world. I am also working to update FrackFinder to include data from 2016 and create an interactive map that can easily display information such as natural gas well pad locations in West Virginia, and when they were drilled, to show how natural gas fracking has impacted West Virginia over time.

I am passionate about sustainability and hope to make this central to my career. Sustainability is the notion of living your life in such a way that you leave resources for the people who come after you. After my time here at SkyTruth I hope to go into government work. I would like to work for the Department of Energy in the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy. Fossil fuels will eventually run out and a transition to renewables will help current climate and environmental issues. I feel that it is important to find solutions now and transition our power needs to something that is more sustainable while we are still able to do so. 

Matthew admires Blackwater Canyon in West Virginia. Photo by Matthew Ibarra.

I believe SkyTruth is important in achieving my goals because I am gaining valuable skills and knowledge that I know will help me in the future. I love working with Geographic Information System programs (GIS). GIS is essentially using computers to analyze physical features of the Earth such as measuring forest density or tracking changing temperatures; it has almost endless applications.  I am learning to work with Google Earth Engine which is essentially a super powerful and intuitive way to work in GIS. Earth Engine requires me to be able to code in the programming language JavaScript and so I’m learning that skill as well. These are skills that will be forever relevant in the future and I am excited to deepen my understanding of them.

When I started college five years ago I never thought that I would end up where I am today. I spent so many sleepless nights trying to finish my physics homework and study my chemistry notes. I never thought that I would want to give all that up to work in something completely different, but I am thankful I did. I am eager to be learning something new every day at SkyTruth and I am thankful to everyone who helped me get to where I am today. I am excited to continue my internship here and keep learning more about what’s important to me.

Matthew is a hockey fan and celebrated the DC Capitals’ Stanley Cup victory in 2018. Photo by Photos Beyond DC.

 

 

A Systematic Search for Bilge Dumping at Sea: 2019 in Review

What can a year’s worth of bilge dumping data tell us?

This is the first entry in a multi-part series revealing the significance of bilge dumping globally. 

Out of sight, beyond the horizon, lies a world of activity taking place in the sea. The ocean encompasses over 70% of the globe, yet most of us only see its edges from the coasts. We’ve built many of humanity’s largest and most advanced societies along coastal regions, yet because the ocean is so remote, much of what happens there remains mysterious.  

You might think of crime at sea as violence (piracy), abuse of natural resources (illegal fishing), or pollution (oil spills). However, at SkyTruth, we’ve recently focused on combating another very troubling action on the water: a serious crime known as bilge dumping. While not as well known as pollution like the Great Pacific Garbage Patch, bilge dumping is a phenomenon that should not be overlooked, and yet it often is. 

Bilge dumping occurs when a vessel illegally releases untreated, oily wastewater into the ocean. This wastewater, known as bilge, collects in the ship’s lower hull and needs to be emptied regularly. Since the 1970’s an international law known as MARPOL has required that bilge water be treated to remove the oil before the bilge can be legally discharged into the sea. When a vessel circumvents treatment and dumps directly into the ocean, its wastewater creates an oily slick on the water. Radar satellite imagery captures these distinctive slicks — dark and opaque — because oil smoothes the surface of the water. This dense oily slick lingers in the water until it’s broken apart by wind and wave action, dispersing toxins and globs of oil that can harm coastal communities and marine ecosystems. Vessel operators probably commit this crime as an act of convenience: to save money or time cleaning up after themselves, imposing on others the negative consequences.

SkyTruth has observed likely bilge dumping incidents around the globe many times since 2007. But in 2019, we started seeking out these incidents more systematically. We focused our daily monitoring efforts on some of the world’s major shipping lanes and on areas where we’ve found problems in the past, cataloguing every incident of bilge dumping we found through imagery. Our intent was to better understand the scope of this recurrent problem. We noted that when we went to look for oily slicks, we always found more! Unfortunately, we began to expect to see them; they were occurring somewhere within the areas we monitored almost every day. And our monitoring only covered a small part of the ocean. 

In total, between January and December 2019, we found 163 slicks averaging 56 kilometers (almost 35 miles) in length. We almost always found bilge dumps using Sentinel-1 imagery:  high-resolution C-band Synthetic Aperture Radar satellite data made available by the European Space Agency. Although this imagery is sparse over the open ocean (see our blog post showing the coverage provided by these and other imaging satellites), it is collected regularly in coastal areas and provided coverage of several areas we considered likely to experience bilge dumping. Figure 1 documents each bilge dump incident we discovered, identified as red dots (note that because our monitoring was not covering the entire ocean, the lack of red dots in many areas on this map doesn’t necessarily mean those areas are free from bilge dumping).

 

Figure 1: Likely bilge dumping events identified by SkyTruth in 2019.

Our work suggests that bilge dumping isn’t sporadic; we repeatedly detected this illegal behavior in shipping lanes across the world, usually surrounding areas with significant energy development or active commercial ports, and often in areas with a “chokepoint” of marine traffic congestion. Bilge dumping was commonly seen in Southeast Asia, the Persian Gulf, and the Gulf of Guinea. Less frequently, but notably, we discovered it off the coast of Brazil, in the Mediterranean Sea, and in the Gulf of Mexico. In some cases, we have been able to identify the polluters, by correlating Automatic Identification System broadcasts (used to prevent collisions) from ships, with the time and location of oily slicks. 

In 2020, SkyTruth is working towards automating this process so we can routinely monitor much more of the ocean. We plan to use machine learning techniques to scan available satellite imagery daily, with the hopes of identifying these slicks automatically. Near real-time detection will allow authorities and the public to respond as soon as they receive notice of the slick, meaning more perpetrators (who might still be nearby, or headed into port) can be caught, and timely actions can be taken to mitigate potential environmental harm.

Figure 2. Likely bilge dump incidents identified by SkyTruth in 2019 by region.

The next segments of this series will explore bilge dumping in more depth, includingWhy should you care?” “How can this be happening?” and “What can be done about it?” We work as  space detectives —  investigating meticulously from above, revealing as much as we can down to the most pressing and actionable details. As we increase monitoring, automate the detection of offshore pollution with the use of machine learning, and raise public awareness, polluters will learn that they are being watched. We believe that more transparency leads to better behavior, better management, and better outcomes for Planet Earth. At SkyTruth, we are working to stop this illegal pollution by giving it the scrutiny it deserves. 

 

Updated 5/11/20

Multiple Accounts of Oily Pollution Found in the Mediterranean Sea

SkyTruth recently discovered two oil slicks in the Mediterranean Sea — just the most recent examples of an ongoing bilge dumping problem we’ve found in one of the most heavily used marine water bodies in the world.

This year, SkyTruth discovered multiple likely bilge dumps in the Mediterranean Sea; two in just the past month. The Mediterranean Sea covers around 2.5 million square kilometers from Spain to Israel. This area is a very prominent shipping route, but finding so many spills here is surprising considering how closely Europe monitors its waters.

The first slick we identified recently is located in the Ligurian Sea off the northwest coast of Italy; more specifically the Riviera di Ponente. This tourist destination is also called “the coast of the setting sun.” Sentinel-1 satellite imagery captured this 33-kilometer slick on October 20, 2019 at 05:36:16 UTC (Coordinated Universal Time) in waters near the Italian Riviera, approximately 60 kilometers southwest of the coast of Genoa, Italy’s sixth largest city.

The Italian Riviera is a popular tourist destination with abundant culture and history, as well as captivating vistas and water recreation activities. Therefore, spotting this oily slick (shown in Figure 1 below) so close to Italy’s coastline was unsettling.

Figure 1: A vessel (a bright dot within the red circle) suspected of bilge dumping (the long, black streak on this radar satellite image) in the Ligurian Sea.

We suspect the Med Pacific, an oil and chemical tanker, is the vessel responsible for the slick. The figure above (Figure 1) shows the vessel track for the Med Pacific as small red dots along the path of the slick. These small red dots are time and location stamped AIS (Automatic Identification System) broadcasts from the Med Pacific, which define the vessel’s path and align closely with the long, dark slick. This close fit between the time and location of the broadcasts, and the position of the vessel and the slick in the satellite image, strongly supports our identification of the vessel causing the slick. 

This tanker is operating under a flag issued by the nation of Malta. Malta is the southern-most and largest island within the Maltese Archipelago, located south of Italy in the Mediterranean Sea.

Figure 2: A photo of the Med Pacific, courtesy of Vessel Finder.

Bilge dumping is unlawful activity in which a ship releases untreated, oily waste water into the ocean, thereby avoiding proper measures of treatment required for safe discharge. Whether intentional — to save money and time — or accidental, bilge dumping is a serious problem. For a more thorough explanation of this illegal act, it’s damaging impact, and the methods SkyTruth uses to identify the vessels responsible, check out our recent post.  

Pictured below is the second likely bilge dumping incident in the Mediterranean Sea. Figure 3 depicts a recent slick captured on Sentinel-1 imagery on November 7, 2019 at 03:59:49 UTC. This suspected bilge dump is located approximately 83 kilometers north of Egypt and spans 60 kilometers. We were unable to identify the vessel responsible for this pollution, however, it is a textbook example of a bilge dump: It has the linear shape of an oily slick discharged from a moving ship, with a very bright speck revealing the vessel at the narrow end of the slick. In order to avoid getting caught, this vessel might have turned off its AIS or intentionally misreported its location. 

Figure 3: An unidentified vessel suspected of bilge dumping in the Mediterranean Sea off the coast of Egypt.

SkyTruth’s discoveries in the Mediterranean are concerning given that multiple marine programs are in place to protect the Mediterranean Sea from this kind of harm. Currently, the European Union and twenty-one coastal countries and states bordering the Mediterranean are joined together in the Mediterranean Action Plan (MAP), created as part of the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) to establish a partnership and commitment to protect their shared marine environment. Eliminating vessel dumping is defined as one of MAP’s main conservation protocols. The Regional Marine Pollution Emergency Response Centre for the Mediterranean Sea (REMPEC) was created from a collaboration between the International Maritime Organization and UNEP, and collaborates with MAP to focus specifically on combating ship pollution and bilge dumping. 

Given this Mediterranean partnership, ocean offenders are clearly not following the established protocols of their countries. In fact, the creator of REMPEC is Malta. As the flag state of Med Pacific, Malta is responsible for ensuring that this vessel operates lawfully. Figure 4 shows the partner countries and states in the Mediterranean Action Plan, as well as two red bounding boxes where the two (Figure 1 and Figure 3) suspected bilge dumps occurred. Note: Malta and Monaco, very small states that are part of MAP, are not shown on the map. 

Figure 4: Partners of the Mediterranean Action Plan. Recent likely bilge dumps shown by red boxes.

These findings in the Mediterranean Sea should not be overlooked. Countries in the Mediterranean region have many ports and popular recreational activities located on their coastlines. These high traffic areas can be negatively impacted by misbehaving vessel operators who could be carrying commodities as innocuous as fruit juice or, conversely, very hazardous cargo, such as oil and chemicals, like the tanker Med Pacific

Bilge dumping is a serious offense. It can harm the health of marine plant and animal species, and damage coastal communities. Despite how heavily the shipping and marine transportation industry is relied on for international commerce, regulations on vessels have progressed more slowly and generally have received less attention than regulations on land polluters. But authorities are starting to pay attention. Come January 1, 2020 the International Maritime Organization is requiring vessels to use a less toxic blend of vessel fuel with lower sulfur concentrations. This will reduce the amount of harmful sulfur oxide pollution going into the air. This new international law will hold vessels around the world to a higher, cleaner standard for fuel.

Taking more steps to protect the waters of the world is important. We hope the addition of more environmental regulations, as well as monitoring existing regulations by SkyTruth and other environmental groups, keeps vessel operators on their best behavior and helps make our oceans clean. 

Bilge Dumping Caught in Indonesia – Again!

SkyTruth identified the bulk carrier Lumoso Aman as the likely polluter via AIS and satellite imagery.

On October 10, 2019, SkyTruth discovered yet another likely bilge dumping incident in Southeast Asian waters. At 10:25:26 UTC (Coordinated Universal Time), Sentinel-1 Imagery captured this oily pollution during routine monitoring of the Makassar Strait. Lingering off the southwest coast of Sulawesi, Indonesia, this oil slick measures approximately 33 kilometers long. The slick and the suspected responsible vessel (circled in red in Figure 1 below) appear roughly 100 kilometers west of the coast of Makassar, the capital of Sulawesi. Makassar is a port city with active commerce and tourism.

Figure 1: A vessel suspected of bilge dumping.

We identified the potential culprit through AIS (Automatic Identification System) broadcasts from the Lumoso Aman (Figure 2), a bulk cargo carrier operating under the flag of Indonesia. 

Figure 2: A picture of the Lumoso Aman, courtesy of Vessel Finder.

Bilge dumping is the disposal of waste water from a ship’s lower hull. Bilge water is supposed to be treated before it’s discharged, but sometimes vessel operators will bypass the pollution control equipment and flush oily, untreated bilge into the ocean – in direct violation of international marine pollution law. You can learn more about this ongoing source of ocean pollution, and how SkyTruth identifies perpetrators, in our recent post about bilge dumping in Southeast Asia.

Our motto at SkyTruth is “If you can see it, you can change it.” We tirelessly monitor the ocean with this vision in mind, to be watchdogs and defenders of our Earth’s waters. No matter how remote these areas of pollution appear to be, we can see them with satellite images. These seemingly remote bodies of water are connected to waters throughout the world. Just as air pollution migrates between contiguous countries or states, oil pollution can find its way to any coastline and harm coastal environments and communities. With continued monitoring, we hope that nations, communities, and enforcement agencies can hold ship operators accountable, making it clear that bilge pollution is an unacceptable threat to the world’s ocean ecosystems. 

Figure 3: SkyTruth intern Tatianna Evanisko tracks polluting vessels around the world from the SkyTruth offices in Shepherdstown WV. Photo credit: Johnna Armstrong.

More oil pollution in southeast Asia: suspected bilge dumping off Indonesia and The Philippines

[This analysis of oil pollution in the waters of southeast Asia was written as part of a collaborative effort between SkyTruth team members Lucy Meyer and Brendan Jarrell.]

Our routine monitoring of the world’s oceans has led to some extraordinary findings. For example, in previous updates, we’ve identified oil slicks in traffic-heavy locations like the Strait of Malacca. But as you’ll see in this post, bilge dumps occur elsewhere in southeast Asia. 

Those who follow our posts are probably familiar with how we identify vessels at sea. To new readers, let us explain what bilge dumping is and how we identify potentially responsible vessels. Bilge dumping is the disposal of waste water from a ship’s lower hull. Bilge water is supposed to be treated before it’s discharged, but sometimes vessel operators will bypass the pollution control equipment and flush oily, untreated bilge into the ocean – in direct violation of marine pollution law. We use images from satellites to monitor for illegal bilge dumping. In satellite imagery, oily bilge dumps usually form distinctive linear slicks. By matching the time of the imagery to broadcasts from a vessel tracking service called automatic identification system (AIS), we can determine the identity of vessels that appear to be causing the slicks. We used this process to identify the vessel associated with a long bilge slick in Figure 1 below.

 

Figure 1: A vessel shown passing through the Sunda Strait, identified as the Sungai Gerong, apparently trailing a long oily bilge slick.

 

This Sentinel-1 radar satellite image from July 2nd shows a slick about 177 kilometers long around the southwest tip of Banten Province, Island of Java, Indonesia (Figure 1). In the yellow box, you can see a vessel at the head of the slick. By investigating AIS broadcasts from exactEarth’s ShipView service, we identified an Indonesian oil products tanker named the Sungai Gerong as the likely vessel. The satellite scene, captured at 22:33 UTC (Coordinated Universal Time), shows a slick that closely aligns to the AIS broadcasts from the Sungai Gerong.

You’ll probably notice that the tail-end of the slick is a bit contorted and offset from the track of the Sungai Gerong. The slick’s appearance was likely influenced by ocean currents and local weather conditions between the time of the ship’s passing and when the image was taken. Global wind maps show that there were 10-15 knot winds blowing northwest up to six hours before the image was acquired. This data suggests that wind likely impacted the slick’s appearance. As a result, we believe that the Sungai Gerong is the likely source of this slick.

Using AIS, we tracked the Sungai Gerong as it traveled north through the Sunda Strait — the body of water between the Indonesian islands of Java and Sumatra — to the port of Jakarta. Similar to the Strait of Malacca, the Sunda is an important waterway that connects the Indian Ocean to the Java Sea. Though not as dense with marine traffic as the Malacca Strait, the Sunda is still subjected to pollution from vessels. 

We also recently identified two suspected bilge dumps in the Philippines (Figure 2). Occurring on July 6th in the South China Sea, a 238 kilometer long slick behind the vessel in this Sentinel-1 radar image looks like a bilge dump. The Philippine island of Palawan, a popular tourist destination for its beautiful natural landscape, appears on the right side of the map frame. Another smaller slick without a known source is visible to the left of the larger slick.

 

Figure 2: The Ulaya makes its way through the South China Sea. Palawan Island, a part of the Philippines, can be seen to the right.

 

Using AIS broadcasts from ShipView, we identified the Ulaya, a Thai oil tanker, as a possible source of the slick. The last AIS broadcast from the Ulaya (seen directly above the ship) was transmitted fifteen minutes before the image was captured. These AIS broadcasts give us reason to believe that the Ulaya could be responsible for this slick. Moreover, ShipView shows that the vessel was headed towards the Port of Belawan in the Strait of Malacca with a shipment of  Dangerous Goods. According to the International Maritime Organization, a United Nations agency that regulates global shipping, chemicals falling under this classification are “hazardous to marine environments.” Thus, a slick from this ship could be of greater concern than usual.

These examples show that bilge dumping continues to be a problem in the waters of southeast Asia. But with satellite imagery, anyone, anywhere can see what’s happening on the water and help to raise the alarm. We hope that our persistent and careful surveillance will inspire others to pressure policy makers, government regulators, and the shipping industry to take strong, coordinated action to stop bilge dumping.